Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii
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In the News

Key Advocates in Protection of Honouliuli Laud President’s Signature of Monument Proclamation

Honolulu, HI – Today, Carole Hayashino and Jane Kurahara joined President Barack Obama in the Oval Office for the official signing of the proclamation declaring Honouliuli a national monument. Carole, the President and Executive Director of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i, and Jane Kurahara, a longtime volunteer for the organization who has worked tirelessly to protect and preserve the site, released the following statements after the signing.
“Today, I think about all the people who made this day possible. Starting with the Campbell Estate vice president who spent a full day with us on the search to locate the site of the Honouliuli Internment Camp to the high school students who wrote letters to President Obama,” said Jane Kurahara, staff associate of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i. “All along our journey to rediscover and preserve Honouliuli people have been supportive, people wanted this to happen, and I am very grateful.”
“Jane Kurahara and I have the honor of representing the memories of Honouliuli internees, all Hawai‘i’s internees, their families, and the thousands who have supported the effort to preserve Honouliuli,” said Carole Hayashino, president and executive director of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i. “Witnessing President Obama sign the declaration to establish the Honouliuli National Monument inspires me. I am inspired by the voices of the Japanese American internees, inspired by the dedicated work of community volunteers, inspired by the overwhelming support from the community and inspired to know that Honouliuli will never be forgotten.”
Opened on March 1, 1943, Honouliuli was the longest operating and largest World War II internment and POW camp in Hawai‘i.  Built on 160 acres in west Oʻahu, the camp site was hidden from view in a deep gulch that the internees called jigoku dani, or “hell valley.”  Honouliuli Internment Camp was constructed on O‘ahu to intern citizens, resident aliens, and prisoners of war.  The camp held approximately 320 internees, mostly second-generation Japanese Americans but also Japanese, German and Italian permanent residents who were living in Hawai‘i.  Honouliuli was also the largest prisoner of war camp in Hawai‘i, incarcerating nearly 4,000 individuals.  In total, during World War II, over 2,300 Japanese American men and women from Hawai‘i were incarcerated, including many prominent community leaders, teachers, journalists, religious leaders, local politicians and World War I veterans.
Support for the designation grew over the spring and summer, when the National Park Service held a series of community meetings throughout Hawai‘i to present their initial findings of a federally-funded study of the site, and invited attendees to offer comments and ask questions.
In December, Hayashino, Jacce Mikulanec, President of the Honolulu Chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League, and Hawai‘i’s congressional leaders including U.S. Senator Brian Schatz presented petitions to Interior Department Secretary Sally Jewell with signatures of more than 6,000 Americans supporting the inclusion of the Honouliuli Internment Camp in the national park system.
For more information, or to connect with spokespeople for comment, please contact Denise Park at (808) 945-7633 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Japanese American Leaders Applaud Announcement that Honouliuli will become a National Monument

Today, leading Japanese American organizations praised the news that President Obama intends to designate the former Honouliuli Internment Camp site on Oʻahu as a national monument, ensuring its future preservation.  Opened on March 1, 1943, Honouliuli was the longest operating and largest World War II internment and POW camp in Hawai‘i.  Built on 160 acres in west Oʻahu, the camp site was hidden from view in a deep gulch that the internees called jigoku dani, or “hell valley.”  Honouliuli Internment Camp was constructed on O‘ahu to intern citizens, resident aliens, and prisoners of war.  The camp held approximately 320 internees, mostly second-generation Japanese Americans but also Japanese, German and Italian permanent residents who were living in Hawai‘i.  Honouliuli was also the largest prisoner of war camp in Hawai‘i, incarcerating nearly 4,000 individuals.  In total, during World War II, over 2,300 Japanese American men and women from Hawai‘i were incarcerated, including many prominent community leaders, teachers, journalists, religious leaders, local politicians and World War I veterans.
“As a new national monument, Honouliuli will be a great gift to our state and nation.  On behalf of the Japanese American internees and their families, I want to thank President Obama for vindicating the honor of those who were incarcerated and for recognizing the historic site as a lesson in injustice and forgiveness for all Americans and for future generations,” said Carole Hayashino, the President and Executive Director of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i.

“President Obama’s action ensures that generations to come will be able to visit the Honouliuli Internment Camp and learn about the experiences of persons of Japanese ancestry who were forced to stay there during the war,” said Governor David Ige. “The monument will remind all who visit of the terrible injustice these families endured, even while many of their husbands, sons and brothers were fighting for the United States.”

Support for the coming designation grew over the spring and summer, when the National Park Service held a series of community meetings throughout Hawai‘i to present their initial findings of a federally-funded study of the site, and invited attendees to offer comments and ask questions.

In December, Hayashino, Jacce Mikulanec, President of the Honolulu Chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League, and Hawai‘i’s congressional leaders including U.S. Senator Brian Schatz presented petitions to Interior Department Secretary Sally Jewell with signatures of more than 6,000 Americans supporting the inclusion of the Honouliuli Internment Camp in the national park system.

For more information, or to connect with spokespeople for comment, please contact Denise Park at (808) 945-7633 Ext. 27 or via email at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Petitions Supporting Park Service Recognition of Honouliuli Presented to Interior Secretary Jewell

BRIAN SCHATZ
United States Senator

For Immediate Release
December 4, 2014
Contact: Michael Inacay (202) 224-3123


SCHATZ, JAPANESE CULTURAL CENTER OF HAWAI‘I, AND THE JAPANESE AMERICAN CITIZENS LEAGUE URGE INTERIOR SECRETARY TO SUPPORT PARK SERVICE PROTECTION OF HONOULIULI

Washington, DC—On December 4, U.S. Senator Brian Schatz (D- Hawai‘i) joined Carole Hayashino, the president and executive director of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i, and Jacce Mikulanec, president of the Honolulu Japanese American Citizens League, to present Interior Department Secretary Sally Jewell with petitions from more than 6,000 Americans requesting the inclusion of Honouliuli Internment Camp in the national park system.

“The Honouliuli Internment Camp serves as a symbol of the constant need to protect the freedoms and rights of every American,” Senator Schatz said.  “I’m proud to stand with the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i, the Japanese American Citizens League, and the thousands of Americans who support protection of this solemn site.  I will continue to work with Secretary Jewell and President Obama to finally give Honouliuli the historic recognition it deserves.”

“The Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai’i greatly appreciates Senator Brian Schatz’s leadership in supporting the preservation of Honouliuli and Hawai’i's internment sites,” said Carole Hayashino, president and executive director of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai’i. “The project has truly been a grassroots effort involving many organizations and individuals.  We are also grateful for the support of the other members of the Hawai‘i Congressional delegation, Senator Mazie Hirono, Congressmembers Colleen Hanabusa and Tulsi Gabbard as well as Congressmember-elect Mark Takai.”

“JACL-Honolulu is pleased that Honouliuli Internment Camp is one step closer to receiving the recognition it deserves.  It is a symbol of what can happen when fear and prejudice dictate policy in our country - and why we must counter racism and prejudice in any form,” said Jacce Mikulanec, President of JACL-Honolulu Chapter.  “JACL has a long history of advocating for civil rights in Hawai‘i and nationally.  We are honored to be part of this pivotal visit and look forward to the work ahead.”

Last year, Schatz met with National Park Service (NPS) Director Jonathan B. Jarvis to discuss the need to complete the special resource study, which was authorized by Congress in 2009 to review the site for potential inclusion in the national park system.  Following the meeting, Schatz sent Director Jarvis a letter to reiterate his support for the Honouliuli Internment Camp’s inclusion in the national park system.

In September, 2013, Secretary Jewell visited Honouliuli Gulch where she saw remnants of the confinement site that historic documents indicate once held 175 buildings, 14 guard towers, and over 400 tents at the 160 acre camp. Jewell also met with local leaders and members of several Japanese cultural organizations who are part of the growing chorus of voices who want to see this difficult chapter in our nation’s history preserved and interpreted for the benefit of generations to come.

In 1943, the Honouliuli Internment Camp was constructed on Oahu to intern citizens, resident aliens, and prisoners of war.  The camp held approximately 320 internees and became the largest prisoner-of-war camp in Hawai‘i.  Honouliuli was the largest and longest-used World War II internment camp in Hawai‘i.

The NPS held a series of public meetings throughout Hawai‘i during May and June 2014 to present the draft study report, answer questions, and accept comments. Following receipt and review of public comments, a final report, including a course of action recommended by the Secretary of the Interior, will be transmitted to Congress.


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Photo by Tami Heilemann, Department of the Interior
Petition

Mahalo for your support of the 2014 “Sharing the Spirit of Aloha” Gala!

Sharing the Spirit of Aloha
Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i Annual Gala
June 21, 2014

(left to right): Grace Lee, Tyler Tokioka, David Furuya, Robyn Furuya, George Tanabe, Willa Tanabe, Carole Hayashino, Allan Ikawa, Wayne Kamitaki, Richard Matsu, Steve Uyehara
gala 2014

The Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i (JCCH) was pleased to present Sharing the Spirit of Aloha on Saturday, June 21 at the Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort, Coral Ballroom. The spirit of aloha is a gift that many throughout the world treasure. There are some that exemplify this spirit in their work and everyday lives. Through their years of service to the community, creative achievements, educational support and dedication to historic and cultural preservation, the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i is proud to honor the following community leaders who exemplify this spirit.
David Ikawa, Hilo, Hawai‘i
Wayne Kamitaki, President of Maui Varieties, Ltd. dba Ben Franklin Crafts and ACE Hardware
Richard Matsu, former vice president, Marukai Corporation
KZOO Radio, David and Robyn Furuya
George and Willa Tanabe, recipients of the Spirit of JCCH award

Mahalo to our Sponsors!

Shogun
Big Island Candies
Edward Enterprises, Inc.
Island Insurance Company, Ltd.

Daimyo
Bank of Hawaii
Ben Franklin Crafts and ACE Hardware / Wayne Kamitaki
First Hawaiian Bank
R. M. Towill Corporation
Richard Matsu
Servco Foundation

Bushi
Alexander and Baldwin, Inc.
Ann Kobayashi
Bowers + Kubota Consulting
Business Insurance Services, Inc.
Cades Schutte LLP
Central Pacific Bank
Enterprise, Alamo & National Car Rental
First Insurance Company of Hawaii, Ltd.
Friends of George & Willa Tanabe
Friends of JCCH
Friends of KZOO Radio
Goodsill Anderson Quinn & Stifel LLLP
Hawaiian Host
Hawaiian Properties, Ltd.
HawkTree International, Inc.
Hokulani Kigyo, LLC
Honolulu Japanese Chamber of Commerce
JCCH Board of Governors
Kobayashi, Sugita & Goda, LLP
KTA Super Stores
Marians Catering
Matsukawa Insurance Agency, Inc.
Meadow Gold Dairies
Monsanto
Morioka ‘Ohana
Edward & Kim Murakami
N&K CPAs, Inc.
Occidental Underwriters of Hawaii, Ltd.
Pacific Guardian Life
The Queen’s Medical Center
Ronald N.S. Ho & Associates, Inc.
S3
Brenda & Lori Teranishi
Tow Choice
United Japanese Society of Hawa‘i (UJSH)
Hoyt Zia & Leigh-Ann Miyasato


Monetary Donors
ABC Stores
Satoru Abe
American Savings Bank
Anonymous
Yoshiko Dykstra
Grove Farm
KAI Hawaii, Inc.
Gail Honda
Dan & Jane Katayama
Jane Kurahara
Ernest & Chiyoko Lau
Fujio & Amy Matsuda
Roy T. & Joyce Matsuo
Shirley M. Miyamoto
Valerie Okihara
Betty Okimura
Pacific Resource Realty
PSH Insurance, Inc.
Roberts Hawaii, Inc.
Walter & Kathleen Saito
Michael & Akane Shimoko
Wallace H. & Sally S. Yokota


Special Acknowledgements
Wayne Kamitaki
Ben Franklin Crafts

Allan Ikawa
Big Island Candies

Joel Kutaka
Celebrations

Steven R. Crocker
Silent Auction

Mark Ibara
Edward Enterprises, Inc.

Sidney Hamada
Flora-Dec Sales, Inc.

Amy Fujikami-Shikuzawa
Fujikami Florist

Grace Lee and Steve Uyehara
Hawaii News Now

Melvin Takemoto
Heartland Payment Systems

Susan Smith
Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki
Beach Resort

Honolulu Chocolate Company

Bishop Eric Matsumoto
Honpa Hongwanji Hawaii Betsuin

Island Manapua / Regal Diner

Ryan Kawamoto
Kinetic Productions, Inc.

Vince Watabu
Obun Hawaii

Alvin and Patricia Okami

Saedene Yee-Ota and Steve Kiyabu
Sae Design

Mike Higgins
Show & Tell

Kenny and Chizuko Endo
Taiko Center of the Pacific

Silent Auction Donors
Wayne Akizaki
Alan Wong’s Restaurants
Alaska Airlines
Anonymous
Arancino Restaurant Group
Armstrong Produce
Ann Asakura
Assaggio Ristorante Italiano
BCBGMAXAZRIA
Bead It!
Big City Diner:
Kaimuki, Kailua,
Ward Center,
Waipio, Pearlridge
Bishop Museum
California Hotel & Casino
Cane Haul Road
Chef Chai
Choco Le‘a
Coco’s Sandal Box
Deja Vu Surf Hawaii
Diamond Head Theatre
DK Restaurants / Sansei Seafood Restaurant & Sushi Bar
DoubleTree Alana Waikiki by Hilton
Down to Earth Organic & Natural
Enterprise Rent-A-Car & National Car Rental
Ezulwini Game Lodges
Fiber Ballet
The Friends of Iolani Palace
Michael Furuya
Global Village - Kailua
Larry Goeas
Hakuyosha Clean Living
Halekulani
HASR Wine Co.
Hawaii Nature Center
Hawaii Opera Theatre
Hawaii Prince Hotel
Hawaiian Airlines
Hawaiian Host, Inc.
Hawaiian Shochu Company
Stacey Hayashi
Carole Hayashino
Hertz
HiLife Clothing Company
Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort
Dr. Susan Hiraoka
Honolulu Theatre for Youth
Honolulu Zoo Society
Hosoda & Morikone, LLC
Hotel Wailea
Ice Palace
Glenn Inouye
Iolani on Kona Street
Joy Ishihara Labrador
Catherine “Cat” Iwami
Jake Shimabukuro
Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i
The Joy of Sake
Mary Kamiya
Audrey Kaneko
Ellen Kazama
KI Design
King’s Hawaiian
Ko Olina Golf Club
KoAloha Inc.
Gale Kobayashi
Kobayashi Sugita & Goda
Kualoa Ranch Hawaii
Christine Kubota
Kumu Kahua Theatre
Duane K. Kurisu
Kyo-ya Hotels & Resorts, LP
KZOO Radio
Janna Lau
Constance Liu
Michele Loudermilk
Maile Way Products, Inc.
Manoa Grand Ballroom
Manuheali‘i
Market City Shopping Center
Marukame Udon / Toridoll USA
Annette Masutani
Maui Divers of Hawaii dba Maui Divers Jewelry
Michel’s at the Colony Surf
Miemiko and Co.
Wayne Miyao
Leigh-Ann Miyasato
Joe Molina
The Mountain Apple Company
Edward Murakami
Mystic Art
Carol Nagano
Deborah & Dawn Nakagawa
Dena Nakahashi
Nippon Golden Network
Eugene Nishimura
The Oahu Club
Val M. Okihara
Margaret E. Okimoto
Shannon Okinaka
Denise Park
Paul Brown Salon
Perry Ellis
Hiromi Peterson
Prince Resorts Hawaii
Pure Joy Day Spa
RAZOR Pearlridge
Gary Reed
REI Food Service, LLC dba Gyotaku
Robyn Buntin of Honolulu
Roy Sakuma
Productions, Inc.
Royal Hawaiian Center
Roy’s
Hanayo Sasaki
Seattle Mariners
Sedona
Wendy Sekiya
Shane Victorino Foundation
Sheraton Hawaii Bowl
Sony Hawaii Company
Rattana Soubandith
South Shore Paperie
Star of Honolulu Cruises &
Events / Rock-A-Hula
Style West
Don Sumada
Seikichi “Chick” Takara
Today’s Thought
Carole Tokioka
Tyler Tokioka
Tori Richard, Ltd.
Yvonne Toyoshima
Tropilicious Ice Cream & Sorbet
Tsukazaki & Associates, LLC
Tsukuneya
University of Hawai‘i Manoa Bookstore
Umbrellas Hawaii
University of Hawaii Office of Intercollegiate Athletics
University of Hawai‘i Press
Ushijima Architects
Vested Interest
Virgo USA
Wailea Golf Club
Watanabe Floral, Inc.
Waterfall Resort Alaska
Lillian Noda Yajima
Amy Young
Zippy’s Restaurants
Stanley Zisk


Event Committee

Gala Event Co-Chairs
Glenn Inouye
Leigh-Ann Miyasato

Table Sponsors Co-Chairs
Brennon Morioka
Tyler Tokioka

Silent Auction Co-Chairs
Shannon Okinaka
Rattana Soubandith

Lucky Number Chair
Diane Murakami

Registration Chair
Susan Haramoto

Program Co-Chairs
Dawn Nakagawa
Justin Takaki
Karlton Tomomitsu

Video Chair
Ryan Kawamoto

Decorations Chair
Traci Fasi-Paiva


Gala Volunteers
Tracey Ah Tou
Quinn Annelin
Nikky Ansai
Arnold Bactista, Jr.
Leticia Buhr
Anna Chung
Alyssa Fujihara
Michelle Fujii
Ashley Gadow
Lisa Goo
Ashley Higa
Sherri Hiraoka
Susan Hiraoka
Koichi Hozumi
Tony Huang
Dawn Ijiri
Lynette Ikenaga
Lisa Inouye
Wendy Ishigo
Mandi Ishihara
Marcie Ishihara
Crystine Ito
Marc Kadota
Sarah Kamida
Junior Kaminaga
Scott Kaneshiro
Lara Karamatsu
Eryn Kawamoto
Cody Kim
Nathan Kimura
Eric Kobayashi
Ross Kohara
Shari Kunimura
Jane Kurahara
Joel Kutaka
Albert Lee
Mark Lee
Nancy Leung
Edward Lung
Mika Mitsuyoshi
Lynn Miyahira
Sharon Mizukami
Karen Mizumoto
Richard Mizusawa
Dominika Mroczko-Bauer
Dara Nakagawa
Lisa Nakama
Carlene Nakamoto
Koji Nakamura
Saya Ninomiya
Bev Nomi
Nadine Ogata
Kazuyo Ogawa
Millie Okada-Miura
Chelsea Okamoto
Tracy Oshima
Andrew Pang
Michael Ruan
Kari Sakuda
David Sanden
Claire Sato
Jennifer Seki
Traci Shimomi
Chelsea Soares
Travis Sonomura
Roshan Suehiro
Jason Sugibayashi
Aimee Tablin
George Takase
Trace Takata
Kellie Takenaka
Christine Tamura
Alysha Tanabe
Cara Tsutsuse
Sharene Urakami
Brice Uyeda
Walter Villalba
Kristine Wada
Marvin Walker
Linda Warashina
Kyle Watanabe
Brian Watase
Susan Wong
Charlene Yamamoto
Desiree Yamamoto
Myles Yamamoto
Tracy Yamane
Gail Yuen
Morgan Ziegler

The Untold Story: Internment of Japanese Americans in Hawaii DVD Now on Sale!

Untold

Following a world premier at the Hawaii International Film Festival (HIFF) and sold-out screenings across the state, The Untold Story: Internment of Japanese Americans in Hawai‘i is now available on DVD.

Produced by the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i, The Untold Story is the first full-length documentary to chronicle the internment experience of Japanese Americans in Hawai‘i. While the story of mass internment of Japanese Americans in California, Oregon and Washington has been well documented, very little is known about the internees and confinements sites in Hawai‘i.

Shortly after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawai‘i authorities arrested several hundred local Japanese on O‘ahu, Maui, Hawai‘i island and Kaua‘i. Within 48 hours those arrested included: Buddhist priests, Japanese language school officials, newspaper editors, business and community leaders. In total, over 2,000 men and women of Japanese ancestry were arrested, detained and interned in Hawai‘i. There was no evidence of espionage or sabotage and no charges were ever filed against them. This film chronicles their story through oral histories, documents, interviews, and reenactments.
       
This project was funded, in part, by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program.  Additional support was provided by the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i, Island Insurance Foundation, The Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation, and the Japanese American Citizens League - Honolulu Chapter.
       
The JCCH Gift Shop is open from Tuesday through Friday 10:00 am – 4:00 pm and Saturdays 9:00 am – 4:00 pm. For more information, please call (808) 945-7633.

Price $24.95; $22.45 for JCCH members.
Shipping rates included on order form.
An all-regions DVD
Approx. 57 minutes. English and Japanese with English subtitles.

Click here to download an order form.

Also Available:
LifeBehindBarbedWire
Life Behind Barbed Wire: The World War II Internment Memoirs of a Hawaii Issei
Author: Soga, Yasutaro

Yasutaro Soga’s Life behind Barbed Wire (Tessaku seikatsu)    is an exceptional firsthand account of the incarceration of a Hawai‘i Japanese during World War II. On the evening of the attack on Pearl Harbor, Soga, the editor of a Japanese-language newspaper, was arrested along with several hundred other prominent Issei ( Japanese immigrants) in Hawai‘i. After being held for six months on Sand Island, Soga was transferred to an Army camp in Lordsburg, New Mexico, and later to a Justice Department camp in Santa Fe. He would spend just under four years in custody before returning to Hawai‘i in the months following the end of the war.
Most of what has been written about the detention of Japanese Americans focuses on the Nisei experience of mass internment on the West Coast—largely because of the language barrier immigrant writers faced. This translation, therefore, presents us with a rare Issei voice on internment, and Soga’s opinions challenge many commonly held assumptions about Japanese Americans during the war regarding race relations, patriotism, and loyalty.

Although centered on one man’s experience, Life behind Barbed Wire benefits greatly from Soga’s trained eye and instincts as a professional journalist, which allowed him to paint a larger picture of those extraordinary times and his place in them. The Introduction by Tetsuden Kashima of the University of Washington and Foreword by Dennis Ogawa of the University of Hawai‘i provide context for Soga’s recollections based on the most current scholarship on the Japanese American internment.

Paperback - Price: $26.00 Member price $23.00

FamilyTorn
Family Torn Apart: The Internment Story of the Otokichi Muin Ozaki Family                                  
Editor: Honda, Gail;

Family Torn Apart is the gripping story of one Hawai‘i family’s World War II odyssey. Otokichi Ozaki, a Japanese immigrant, was a Japanese language school teacher, tankapoet, and anthurium grower and also a leader of the Japanese community in the city of Hilo on the Big Island of Hawai‘i. A devoted family man, he and his Hawai‘i-born wife, Hideko, had four children ranging in age from two to eight when war broke out. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, he was one of several hundred immigrant community leaders to be arrested, beginning a long journey for Ozaki and his family. Based on letters, poetry, and radio scripts in the collection of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i, and translated here for the first time, Family Torn Apart traces Ozaki’s incarceration at eight different detention camps, his family’s life in Hawai‘i without him, their decision to ‘voluntarily’ enter Mainland detention camps in the hope of reuniting, and their subsequent frustration as that reunion bogged down in red tape and government apathy. Relying on Japanese language primary sources, Family Torn Apart brings alive the Japanese immigrant perspective on the World War II incarceration, intergenerational relations, and life under martial law in Hawai‘i. It is a stirring story of the human spirit in difficult times and a cautionary tale for future generations. 36 illustrations.

Distributed by the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i
Paperback - Price: $26.00 Member price $23.00

MidWeek Business Roundtable: Doing It For the Ancestors

MidWeek Business Roundtable

People Who Make Hawaii Work: Carole Hayashino

News

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